Cheat Sheets for PHP, Ruby on Rails, MySQL, CSS and SEO

I went on a bit of a Cheat Sheet binge this month. Working on a couple of projects using various technologies means I keep bouncing around looking for stuff so I thought I’d better get some cheat sheets up on my wall to save me time.

Most of these are from one site, the brilliantly named “ILoveJackDaniels” by UK web developer Dave Child:

  1. Ruby on Rails Cheat Sheet
  2. PHP Cheat Sheet
  3. MySQL Cheat Sheet
  4. CSS Cheat Sheet and more from the same site
  5. The Web Developers SEO Cheat Sheet by Danny Dover of SEOmoz.orgĀ 
  6. Conversion table for em, px, pt & % in CSS by Suresh Jain

Ruby and PHP are the Leading Web Development Languages according to Sun’s Tim Bray

Tim Bray, director of Web Technologies at Sun Microsystems, said in April’s Ruby Conference that Ruby and PHP are the languages of choice for new web applications.

Both Ruby and PHP are open source and therefore it comes as no surprise that both these languages are being taken up far more quickly than established languages like Java.

There are other factors too; One of the main ones is that many new web applications need to reach their market as quickly as possible. Applications developed in compiled languages like Java cannot be rolled out iteratively as compared to those developed using interpreted scripting languages like Ruby or PHP making them far less desirable.

There are also quite a few web development frameworks built on these two languages around now, Rails based on Ruby and Symfony based on PHP are two that I know of. This makes it even faster, and easier, to develop and deploy a new web application.

Find out more about:

BuildingWebApps.com – A great resource for Ruby on Rails Developers

I know this has nothing, well almost nothing, to do with Internet-related business but I’m so impressed with this site and its founders that I just had to write about it.

For those of you who may not know of it, Rails is a web development framework built using the programming language Ruby. The framework is popularly known as Ruby on Rails.

I’ve finally found some time, after almost a year of trying, to get into learning Rails. As a web developer and programmer it’s important for me to:

  1. Keep up with the latest technology in web development to build my own projects and projects for clients;
  2. And to keep up with the technology so I know what’s possible when I’m thinking of, or developing, a new Internet-based business.

Anyway, in my quest to learn Rails, I found the site www.buildingwebapps.com, created by Mike Slater and Christopher Haupt the founders of Collective Knowledge Works, Inc. a web development agency in the US.

If you’re learning Rails or are interested in learning Rails I highly recommend this site.